648MW solar project in India

ABB has successfully commissioned five substations to integrate a 648 megawatt solar project at Kamuthi in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu to the national transmission grid. The project was awarded by independent power producer the Adani Group in 2015, and completed on schedule. The solar photo-voltaic project – made up of five plants in a single location – is the largest of its kind in the world. 360 MW from the solar project is currently grid-connected and at full capacity this facility will account for nearly 10 percent of the country’s current solar capacity of around seven gigawatts.

Adani’s 648 MW solar power plant

The Adani 648MW solar power plant

The project contributes to India’s vision of achieving 100 GW of solar power by 2022, with the overall aim of diversifying its energy mix to meet growing demand while minimizing environmental impact. As part of this plan, the government has issued a proposal to implement 25 ultra-mega solar power projects with capacities between 500 and 1,000 MW over a period of five years. The government of Tamil Nadu is also pursuing a solar policy which envisages a solar generation capacity addition of 3,000 MW.

“We are proud to support the country’s clean energy vision and push for solar power which demonstrates its commitment to sustainable growth,” said Claudio Facchin, President of the ABB Power Grids division. “This project exemplifies our end-to-end power and automation system integration capabilities and reinforces our commitment to the renewable energy sector, a key component of the ABB ‘Next Level’ strategy.”

The ABB project scope included the design, supply, installation and commissioning related to the solar plant electrification and automation systems. This includes two 230 kilovolt and three 110 kV outdoor switchyards to connect to the local transmission grid and will enable clean power supply for around 150000 households, based on average national per capita consumption.

ABB to strengthen the power infrastructure in Indonesia

ABB is to support the Indonesian state-owned utility Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN) to strengthen the reliability and enhance the efficiency of its Java-Bali transmission and distribution networks to meet the growing demand for power in Java, the most populated island on earth.

ABB will design, engineer, supply and install the substation extensions, including switchgear, transformers, state-of-the-art control and protection systems as well as ancillary equipment. The product scope will include 11 units of 60 megavolt-ampere (MVA) transformers, high-voltage air-insulated switchgear for eight substations, high-voltage gas-insulated switchgear for one substation as well as the replacement works and control systems for uprating the transformers in three other substations. Financed by the Asian Development Bank, the $11m project is scheduled to be completed in 2017.

@ProcessingTalk

(c) ProcessingTalk.info

Advertisements

Emerson to buy Chloride: ABB backs out

5 June: The Emerson bid to acquire Chloride in the UK originated with talks in early 2008, that came to nothing. However, Emerson sees Chloride as the European lead HQ for its network power systems business, and is still persistent,  despite the rejection of its £723M offer, 275p a share, made at the end of April. But all the plans of David Farr, Chairman and CEO at Emerson, fell apart, when Chloride reported underlying profits at the top end of city expectations: but surely Farr knew that they were in this good position and should have been delighted to see his expectations confirmed! Chloride has been growing fast in supplying un-interruptible power supplies to provide security to keep major companies operating through power cuts. This is not just a growing market in the developing regions, like India and China, but also happening across the US and Europe, as power supplies become less reliable, and continuity of supply more important.  But Chloride has also expanded with new offices in Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Vietnam, South Korea and the Philippines.

While Emerson canvasses major shareholders to assess what price would be attractive, the share price continues upwards, past 286p, and even at this level the institutions are still buying in. So Emerson will have to dig deeper, unless the pressure on the pound generated by anti-British sentiment in the US over the BP problems comes to their rescue.

8 June: ABB joins the party! Or should that be the fray? ABB have made a counter offer to buy the Chloride Group, pitched at 325p a share, giving a total offer value of £860Million and topping the Emerson bid. This offer has been recommended for shareholder acceptance by the Chloride Board. The stock market obviously expects another bid, with the current share price standing at 342p.

15 June: It seems that industry analysts predict there will be no counter-bid by Emerson to top the ABB offer, so it seems that the stock market appetite for a battle was just the over-enthusiasm whipped up by greedy investors.

30 June: A new offer from Emerson of 375p a share, almost USD1.5 billion, sent Chloride’s share price up 37p to 385½p, amid expectations ABB will hit back with a higher offer.

1 July: ABB announce that in the interests of taking a disciplined approach to such acquisitions, a higher offer from ABB would not be appropriate.

ABB acquires K-Tek

ABB Process Automation has added Louisiana-based K-Tek, a manufacturer of liquid level detection and measurement systems, to their Measurement Products Business Unit. Veli-Matti Reinikkala, head of the Process Automation division, commented that “K-Tek is well established, particularly in the oil and gas industry, which is a growth area for ABB”.  K-Tek is quoted as being recognized as a global leader in magnetic level gauges, magnetostrictive level transmitters and laser level transmitters, with sales of USD50 million and 250 employees. They also manufacture guided wave radar and ultrasonic level measurement systems, RF capacitance level systems, vibrating fork level switches, bulk solids level measurement products and pressure / temperature switches: no overlap is quoted with the current ABB product portfolio.

Liquid level switching and level measurement systems seem to have been the ‘poor relation’ in terms of the technology adopted by major US process control companies. Indeed the main players in this field seem to have been European, with Bestobell Mobrey, Endress+Hauser and Vega being in the forefront of the industry there, and the main US supplier being Magnetrol. Then with the advent of radar systems, Saab in Sweden joined the European majors, only to be acquired by Emerson: Mobrey followed that route later and both now operate within their Rosemount Measurement Division. K-Tek started in 1975, and has grown significantly, although 350,000 installations in 35 years does not make them a major level controls supplier. The E+H Liquiphant sold a million units in the 17 years after its introduction in 1983, and another half million in the three years after that.

So will there be any further acquisitions in this part of the industry? Vega might join a European consolidation of instrumentation companies, but would not be a likely target for a US company. Will one of the majors like Yokogawa, Invensys or Honeywell wish to add more of the basic sensor manufacturing and snap up Magnetrol? It looks more likely that ABB would consider this as an interesting additional option to expand their level capability. But then maybe Magnetrol itself will consider a product expansion and move further into Europe, alongside the likes of Krohne?