H2S detection at a viable cost

A recent fatal accident in a biogas plant in the southern UK highlights the need for cost effective hydrogen sulphide/sulfide monitoring systems on biogas and sewage sites, particularly where wet scrubbers are used to remove H2S from gas effluent streams.

Analytical Technology reports the development of a hydrogen sulphide monitor that enables the measurement of H2S in such difficult applications, while offering savings of up to 90% compared to the previous technologies available.

The Q45S monitor offers a continuous, accurate and reliable approach to on-line H2S monitoringin wet conditions, at an affordable cost. Installed for around GBP2000, the Q45S uses a sensor designed to operate in a condensing gas stream, without the water vapour blinding the sensor, which can typically happen with conventional sensors.

Dry media, chemical and bio-scrubbing odour control systems start from GBP30k, yet some H2S monitors can also cost GBP20k, which is just not viable. Sewage treatment plants often struggle to justify this expense, when it is almost as costly as the main installation.

Michael Strahand, the ATi European General Manager, said: “For those facilities with limited budgets, our methods of monitoring sulphides cost effectively overcome the issues associated with hydrogen sulphide measurement and odour control.

“ATi’s Q54S Wet Sensor for Scrubbers allows true control of the dosing systems and accurate monitoring of the H2S levels, offering a complete solution to combating odour problems.” The Q54S also provides set point alarm relays to enable remote alarm activation. The digital display and the analogue output provide H2S measurement levels scaled from 0-2ppm up to 0-200ppm.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: